Fact about Prague Tourism

on Wednesday, November 11, 2009

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About Prague

The story of Prague is no less turbulent than that of similarly large cities in Central Europe. It saw its first golden age under the rule of Charles IV in the 14th century. Prague was, at that time, the third largest city in Europe and witnessed something of an explosion in construction: the Charles University, the New Town, the Charles Bridge, and Saint Vitus Cathedral were all built during this period.

Most of the following centuries were passed in the same manner as other major central European cities i.e. in a frenzy of murder, battles, occupations, and looting: all of which has enriched the history of the place but was mighty miserable for the poor inhabitants of the time. After the German invasion Prague became the capital of Czechoslovakia, and remained relatively unscathed during the German occupation and Russian liberation. The Americans inadvertantly bombed the city in 1945, killing hundreds of residents, after somehow mistaking it for the German city of Dresden (which lies some 83 miles away).

Prague suffered in much the same way as the rest of the country during harsh Soviet-imposed Communist rule, and it was here that the Velvet Revolution was born and completed in 1989. Today, Prague is indisputably a modern European city and is becoming the capital of Central Europe. Many large companies have their regional headquarters here and the city is an enticing investment location, despite being more wealthy (and therefore expensive) than many Western counterparts.
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